To Whom do you surrender?

Dear reader, we are conscious beings who have the potential created in us by God to distinguish between right and wrong. The foundation of a happy and successful life lies upon a person’s knowing his responsibility before God and in serving only God. In the words of God Almighty: “O ye who believe! Come, all of you, into submission (unto Him); (Quran, 2:208); yet in contrast to this requirement, we see many people complain that they cannot submit as they should. Indeed some people have little insight into the limitless Power, Majesty, and Glory of God and to the purpose of our creation; they try to live their lives according to rules of their own imagination, thus spending their whole lives in conflict, strife, violence, unhappiness and hopelessness. Mawlana Faizani explains that the root cause behind this issue is that people often fail to bother with the pre-requisites necessary to lead them to submission. Hence, this month’s Soul Booster encourages us to focus our attention and constantly practice our faith by pondering on the wonders of God’s creation and on His favors to us. From this activity, we acquire perfect faith in Him Almighty, and are led to a life of real thankfulness and submission, free from ignorance.

To Whom Do You Surrender?

Man is the being who finds himself obliged to surrender in front of people of power, wisdom and knowledge, especially if he finds that another person’s special skills are more advanced or effective than his own. Unfortunately, however, after observing all kinds of Power and Perfections of His Supreme, Eternal, and Self-existent Being, he still does not show the required respect, nor does he acquire insight into Almighty God. Except for a small number of people, the rest have not sought this goal. Moreover, some unfortunate people have ascribed partners to Almighty God, and some ignorant have totally denied the Existence of His Almighty.

— by Mawlana Faizani
Arguments for Proving the Existence of Almighty God through Logic

Practicing the Soul Booster:

Few concerns are as central to Islam as the search for knowledge. In the Holy Qur’an, Almighty God never commanded His Prophet (PBUH) the most knowledgeable of all human beings to seek the increase of anything except knowledge, “My Lord, increase me in knowledge!”1 Therefore it is important for us to imitate Prophet Muhammad (PBUH) in this quest. “Are they equal,” asks the Holy Qur’an, “those who know and those who know not?”2 The answer is self-evident. Hence, as the Prophet said, “The search for knowledge is incumbent upon every Muslim,”3 especially when one needs to clear from one’s heart the clouds (darkness) of ignorance and uncertainties. As we contemplate and reason on the wonders of God’s creation, regardless how much insight we attain about Him, at the end we can only say, Exalted be He, as we ultimately come to realize that we as creatures are unable to grasp the Creator, “Our Lord embraces all things in knowledge.”4 and “Exalted is He over what they claim.”5 However, it remains important for us to “… worship your Lord until there comes unto you the Hour that is certain.”6 Or, worship your Lord until there comes unto you the state of absolute certainty free of all doubts and suspicions. Or worship your Lord until one is overcome by His presence and filled with His Light of Guidance.

The easiest ways to acquire knowledge which leads to true submission to God is through contemplation (fikr). If the faculty of contemplation is properly used, it will aid us in the acquisition of correct knowledge and insight into God and thereby lead us to proper submission and eternal salvation. Of course, much may be done by means of knowledge, however it is important for us not to separate our fikr-gleaned knowledge from the practice and good works that we do, otherwise that knowledge is of no use to us. Therefore, we encourage you to make an effort to regularly read the books of Mawlana Faizani which guide you in perfecting these techniques; all based on the sound intergity of the Quran and the Hadith of Prophet Muhammad (PBUH).

 

A Soul Booster!

 

 

The Value and Worth of Your Life

“Man is the being who does not know the value and worth of his life. Hence, he could spend leisure times educating himself or reading literature and teachings which enable him to enlighten his heart, and to acquire faith. He could get access to great people’s speeches which he could then use as the theoretical and practical sermons, whereby he himself, could write enlightening literature. However, contrary to these actions and steps indispensable for the improvement of human society, he is committing his leisure time to various corrupt amusements such as gambling, and to the heart and brain destructive songs. If this is not accessible then subconsciously he becomes preoccupied with his own inner quarrels, and he does not know any way to save himself from this perdition.”

— by Mawlana Faizani
Man and Some of Satan’s Plots

Practicing the Soul Booster:

  • Always have a book around to enlighten your heart and strengthen your faith. Having reading material available makes it easier for you to take advantage of your free time.
  • Set a reading goal. Determine how much time you want to spend reading, or how many books you want to read over time. Your goal might be a book a month, or one per week, or you might want to read 30 minutes every day. Setting a goal is the first step towards reading more.
  • Keep a log. Keep a list of the books you read. You might keep this list in your journal or your day planner.
  • Keep a list. Make a list of things you want to read in the future. By knowing what great stuff you want to read, you reinforce your reading habit and its a great way to keep your enthusiasm up. For specific titles you might want to include on your reading list, please contact us.
  • Build your own reading strategy. Determine what works best for you, develop your own ideas and make them work for you.
  • Regularly read the books of Mawlana Faizani. “These books and epistles, with God’s help, have been arranged merely for the development of your spiritual powers, intellectually based on excellent and logical philosophy. Through simple ways, these books and epistles will fortify your faith and spirituality such that each minute’s engagement with them is equivalent to a year of worship.”    — by Mawlana Faizani

 

Non Muslims opinions about prophet Muhammad PBUH.

Non-Muslim Opinions of Muhammad (PBUH)

The following quotes of famous non-Muslim personalities have been compiled from numerous sources. On close analysis, one naturally comes to the conclusion that anyone who truly studies this Man is in awe of the person of Muhammad (PBUH).

The following extract has been taken from the book “The 100 – a Ranking of the Most Influential Person in History” by Michael H. Hart, a Christian American, an astronomer, a mathematician, a chess master, and a scientist. After extensive research, he rated prophet Muhammad (PBUH) as number one and to be considered as the most influential single figure in human history.

“My choice of Muhammad to lead the list of the world’s most influential person may surprise some readers and may be questioned by others, but he was the only man in history who was supremely successful on both the religious and secular levels. It is probable that the relative influence of Muhammad on Islam has been larger than the combined influence of Jesus Christ and St. Paul on Christianity. Furthermore, Muhammad (unlike Jesus) was a secular as well as religious leader. In fact, as the driving force behind the Arab conquests, he may well rank as the most influential political leader of all time. It is this unparalleled combination of secular and religious influence, which I feel, entitles Muhammad to be considered the most influential single figure in human history.”

Mahatma Gandhi, speaking on the character of Muhammad, (pbuh) says in (Young India):

“I wanted to know the best of one who holds today’s undisputed sway over the hearts of millions of mankind. I became more than convinced that it was not the sword that won a place for Islam in those days in the scheme of life. It was the rigid simplicity, the utter self-effacement of the Prophet, the scrupulous regard for his pledges, his intense devotion to this friends and followers, his intrepidity, his fearlessness, his absolute trust in God and in his own mission. These and not the sword carried everything before them and surmounted every obstacle. When I closed the 2nd volume (of the Prophet’s biography), I was sorry there was not more for me to read of the great life.”

Additionally, other non-Muslims have written their opinions concerning Muhammad (PBUH):

“It is impossible for anyone who studies the life and character of the great Prophet of Arabia, who knew how he taught and how he lived, to feel anything but reverence for that mighty Prophet, one of the great messengers of the Supreme. And although in what I put to you I shall say many things which may be familiar to many, yet I myself feel, whenever I reread them, a new way of admiration, a new sense of reverence for that mighty Arabian teacher.”

Annie Besant in “The Life and Teachings of Mohammad”

“Muhammad was the soul of kindness, and his influence was felt and never forgotten.”

Diwan Chand Sharma, “The Prophets of the East”

“People like Pasteur and Salk are leaders in the first sense. People like Gandhi and Confucius, on the other hand, and Alexander, Caesar on the other, are leaders in the second and perhaps the third sense. Jesus and Buddha belong in the third category alone. Perhaps the greatest leader of all time was Mohammad, who combined all the three functions. To a lesser degree Moses did the same.”

Jules Masserman in “Who Were Histories Great Leaders?” TIME Magazine.

“Head of State as well as Church, he was Caesar and Pope in One; but he was Pope without the Pope’s pretensions, and Caesar without the legions of Caesar, without a standing army, without a bodyguard, without police force, without a fixed revenue. If ever a man ruled by right Divine, it was Muhammad, for he had all the powers without their supports. He cared not for the dressings of power. The simplicity of his private life was in keeping with his public life.”

Reverend Bosworth Smith in “Muhammad and Muhammadanism”

“Four years after the death of Justinian, A.D. 569, was born in Mecca, in Arabia, the man Muhammad, who of all men, has exercised the greatest influence upon the human race. To be the religious head of many empires, to guide the daily life of one-third of the human race, may perhaps justify the title of a Messenger of God.”

Dr. William Draper, M.D. L.L.D. in “History of Intellectual Development of Europe”

“In little more than a year he was actually the spiritual, nominal and temporal ruler of Medina, with his hands on the lever that was to shake the world.”

John Austin, “Muhammad the Prophet of Allah” in T.P.’s and Cassel’s Weekly

“Never has a man set for himself, voluntarily or involuntarily, a more sublime aim, since this aim was super human; to subvert superstitions which had been imposed between man and his Creator, to render God unto man and man unto God; to restore the rational and sacred idea of divinity amidst the chaos of the material and disfigured gods of idolatry, then existing. Never has a man undertaken a work so far beyond human power with so feeble means, for he Muhammad had in the conception as well as in the execution of such a great design, no other instrument than himself and no other aid except a handful of men living in a corner of the desert. Finally, never has a man accomplished such a huge and lasting revolution in the world, because in less than two centuries after its appearance, Islam, reigned over the whole of Arabia, and conquered, in God’s name, Persia, Khorasan, Transoxania, Western India, Syria, Egypt, Abyssinia, all the known continent of Northern Africa, numerous islands of the Mediterranean Sea, Spain and part of Gaul.

If greatness of purpose, smallness of means, and astonishing results are the three criteria of human genius, who could dare compare any great man in history with Muhammad? The most famous men created arms, laws, and empires only. They founded, if anything at all, no more than material powers which often crumbled away before their eyes. This man moved not only armies, legislations, empires, peoples, dynasties, but millions of men in one-third of the then inhabited world; and more than that, he moved the altars, the gods, the religions, the ideas, the beliefs and the souls. The founder of twenty terrestrial empires and of one spiritual empire that is Muhammad. As regards all standards by which human greatness may be measured, we may well ask, is there any man greater than he?

Alphonse de LaMartaine in “Historie de la Turquie”

“The league of nations founded by the Prophet of Islam put the principle of international unity of human brotherhood on such Universal foundations as to show candle to other nations. The fact is that no nation of the world can show a parallel to what Islam has done – the realization of the idea of the League of Nations.”

C. Snouck Hurgronje, “Where Christian and Mohammedan Meet”

Prophet Muhammad (PBUH) – Untainted and Pure

“After the fall of Mecca, more than one million square miles of land lay at his feet. Lord of Arabia, he mended his own shoes and coarse woolen garments, milked the goats, swept the earth, kindled the fire and attended the other menial offices of the family. The entire town of Medina where he lived grew in wealth in the later days of his life. Everywhere there was gold and silver in plenty and yet in those days of prosperity many weeks would elapse without a fire being kindled in the hearth of the king of Arabia; his food being dates and water. His family would go hungry many nights successively because they could not get anything to eat in the evening. He slept on no soft bed but on a palm mat, after a long busy day to spend most of his night in prayer, often bursting into tears before his Creator to grant him strength to discharge his duties. As the reports go, his voice would get choked with weeping and it would appear as if a cooking pot was on fire and boiling had commenced. On the very day of his death his only assets were few coins a part of which went to satisfy a debt and rest was given to a needy person who came to his house for charity. The clothes in which he breathed his last breath had many patches. The house from where light had spread to the world was in darkness because there was no oil in the lamp. Circumstance changed, but the Prophet of God did not. In victory or in defeat, in power or in adversity, in affluence or in indigence, he is the same man, disclosed the same character. Like all the ways and laws of God, Prophets of God are unchangeable.”

Professor Ramakrishna Rao, “Islam and Modern Age”

As now so always, down the centuries, across the planet, from end to end, billions and billions of men and women have lived all their lives, loving the Prophet and trying to follow in his footsteps, as no one else has been so loved and followed. They have lived and died, believed and acted, married and raised families, worshipped and ruled, made war and peace, even eaten and dressed, walked and slept, just as he did or taught them to do.

Indeed, never in history has a man influenced mankind, even beyond his death, so deeply and so pervasively as Prophet Muhammad (PBUH) has. He brings light and peace to countless hearts and lives. They love him more dearly than their own selves. In him they find their greatest source of inspiration and guidance. He is the ultimate norm and the perfect example for them. Faith in him is their mainstay and he is their chief source of support and comfort in all personal vicissitudes and tribulations. To him they also look to lead them through social and political turmoil. He has always inspired them to greater and greater heights of spiritual and moral upliftment and civilizational achievements. And he still does-

 

www.islamcity.com

Welcome to IslamiCity World Wide Payer Times.
In many places in the world this application is called namaz times, azan/athan times or salat/salah/shalat times.

To find out the prayer times in your city, you must first locate your city in our database. You may search your city by either the city name or for more accurate results by its zip code:

http://www.islamicity.com/prayerTimes/?gclid=CNC83f2FwK0CFVBlfAodqhR0_Q&AspxAutoDetectCookieSupport=1

 

About the Islamic Calendar

 

The Islamic calendar is lunar, like the Jewish calendar, with of 12 months of 29 or 30 days each, for a total of 354 days, but the Islamic calendar makes no corrections to align it with the solar calendar so each year the Islamic holidays occur earlier and do not always fall in the same season.

Months of the Islamic calendar

  • Muharram
  • Safr
  • Rabi’ al-Awwal (or Rabi I)
  • Rabi’ al-Thani (or Rabi II)
  • Jumada al-Ula (or Jumada I)
  • Jumada al-Thaniyya (or Jumada II)
  • Rajab
  • Sha’ban
  • Ramadan
  • Shawwal
  • Dhu al-Qa’dah
  • Dhu al-Hijjah

Islamic Holidays

Al Hijra: Islamic New Year’s Day – First day of the Islamic New Year celebrated on the first day of Muharram. Al Hijra is the day when Mohammed began his migration from Mecca to Medina in Islamic Year 1 (1 AH), 622 CE.

  • January 10th 2008
  • December 29, 2008
  • December 18, 2009
  • December 7, 2010
  • November 26, 2011

Ashura – Day of mourning, observed on the 10th of Muharram, the first month of the Islamic year. It is a day of commemoration of the martyrdom of Imam Hussain a.s., the grandson of The Prophet Muhammad s.a.w.

  • January 19, 2008
  • January 7, 2009
  • December 27, 2009
  • December 16, 2010
  • December 5, 2011

Milad an-Nabi – Birthday of the Prophet Muhammad

March 20, 2008

Ramadan – 9th month of the Islamic Calendar – holy month of fasting
Based on a lunar calendar and therefore varies every year.

The Holy Month of Ramadan is a time when Muslims fast during daylight hours to celebrate the time when Allah revealed the first verses of the Qu’ran, the holy book of Islam.
It is a time for spiritual reflection, prayer, doing good deeds, charity, spending time with loved ones. It teaches self-discipline, self-restraint, generosity and understanding of those less fortunate.

Begins:

  • September 2, 2008
  • August 22, 2009
  • August 11, 2010
  • August 1, 2011

Eid ul-Fitr – Marks the end of Ramadan. It starts the day after Ramadan ends. It’s significance is to celebrate the achievement of enhanced piety. A day of forgiveness, fellowship and unity, a time of giving and sharing. 

  • October 2, 2008
  • Sept 20, 2009
  • Sept 10, 1010
  • Aug 30, 2011
  • Aug 19, 2012
  • Aug 8, 2013
  • July 29, 2014
  • July 19, 2015

Eid al-Adha – Religious festival celebrated by Muslims and Druze worldwide as a commemoration of Ibrahim’s (Abraham’s) willingness to sacrifice his son, as commanded by Allah. (Muslim tradition names Ishmael as the son who was to be sacrificed, whereas the Judeo-Christian tradition names Isaac.)

  • Dec 9, 2008
  • Nov 27, 2009
  • Nov 16, 2010
  • Nov 6, 2011
  • Oct 26, 2012
  • Oct 15, 2013
  • Oct 4, 2014
  • Sept 23, 2015
  • Sept 11, 2016
  • Sept 1, 2017
  • Aug 21, 2018
  • Aug 11, 2019
  • July 31, 2020

 

gregorian and hijri calendar:

 

There are many ways of marking time — the day, the month, and the year. Presently, we have three main calendars based on different ways of marking time — the Western calendar, also called the Christian calendar or the Gregorian calendar; the Islamic calendar or Hijri calendar; and the Jewish calendar or Hebrew calendar.

Perhaps the fundamental way to categorize calendars is by their core event; that is, what the calendar is based on. The Christian or Western calendar is a lunar calendar based on Christ’s birth. Even though there is a different labeling system between the religious and the secular, the years are set around Christ’s birth. In religious and traditional secular use, the years according to the Western calendar are labeled in a way that directly acknowledges the base date as being Jesus’ birth. That is, the year is labeled as BC for Before Christ or AD, Anno Domini, or, in the year of our Lord. More and more, secular uses employ a newer marking system which doesn’t recognize that the dates correspond to Christ’s birth. They mark the year as BCE or CE where BCE stands for Before the Common Era, and CE stands for the Current Era, Common Era, or Christian Era.

 The Gregorian calendar is generally used synonymously with the Christian and Western calendar. The Gregorian version, however, was actually named after Pope Gregory XIII. It has a year comprised of 12 months and 365 days, 366 in a leap year, which occurs by adding a day in February every four years. While the Gregorian calendar is based on the Julian calendar — the calendar was introduced around 45 BCE by Julius Caesar after consulting an astronomer — the Gregorian calendar is also based on the year of Christ’s birth.

The Gregorian calendar sought to improve on its predecessors. The purpose was to have a more regular format than the lunar calendars and Julian calendar. The Gregorian calendar took the place of the Julian calendar around the end of the 16th Century.

hijri gregorian calendar?

What is the Difference Between the Western, Islamic, and Jewish Calendars?

 

 

There are many ways of marking time — the day, the month, and the year. Presently, we have three main calendars based on different ways of marking time — the Western calendar, also called the Christian calendar or the Gregorian calendar; the Islamic calendar or Hijri calendar; and the Jewish calendar or Hebrew calendar.

Perhaps the fundamental way to categorize calendars is by their core event; that is, what the calendar is based on. The Christian or Western calendar is a lunar calendar based on Christ’s birth. Even though there is a different labeling system between the religious and the secular, the years are set around Christ’s birth. In religious and traditional secular use, the years according to the Western calendar are labeled in a way that directly acknowledges the base date as being Jesus’ birth. That is, the year is labeled as BC for Before Christ or AD, Anno Domini, or, in the year of our Lord. More and more, secular uses employ a newer marking system which doesn’t recognize that the dates correspond to Christ’s birth. They mark the year as BCE or CE where BCE stands for Before the Common Era, and CE stands for the Current Era, Common Era, or Christian Era.

 The Gregorian calendar is generally used synonymously with the Christian and Western calendar. The Gregorian version, however, was actually named after Pope Gregory XIII. It has a year comprised of 12 months and 365 days, 366 in a leap year, which occurs by adding a day in February every four years. While the Gregorian calendar is based on the Julian calendar — the calendar was introduced around 45 BCE by Julius Caesar after consulting an astronomer — the Gregorian calendar is also based on the year of Christ’s birth.

The Gregorian calendar sought to improve on its predecessors. The purpose was to have a more regular format than the lunar calendars and Julian calendar. The Gregorian calendar took the place of the Julian calendar around the end of the 16th Century.

hijri and gregorian calendar?

What is the Difference Between the Western, Islamic, and Jewish Calendars?

There are many ways of marking time — the day, the month, and the year. Presently, we have three main calendars based on different ways of marking time — the Western calendar, also called the Christian calendar or the Gregorian calendar; the Islamic calendar or Hijri calendar; and the Jewish calendar or Hebrew calendar.

Perhaps the fundamental way to categorize calendars is by their core event; that is, what the calendar is based on. The Christian or Western calendar is a lunar calendar based on Christ’s birth. Even though there is a different labeling system between the religious and the secular, the years are set around Christ’s birth. In religious and traditional secular use, the years according to the Western calendar are labeled in a way that directly acknowledges the base date as being Jesus’ birth. That is, the year is labeled as BC for Before Christ or AD, Anno Domini, or, in the year of our Lord. More and more, secular uses employ a newer marking system which doesn’t recognize that the dates correspond to Christ’s birth. They mark the year as BCE or CE where BCE stands for Before the Common Era, and CE stands for the Current Era, Common Era, or Christian Era.

 The Gregorian calendar is generally used synonymously with the Christian and Western calendar. The Gregorian version, however, was actually named after Pope Gregory XIII. It has a year comprised of 12 months and 365 days, 366 in a leap year, which occurs by adding a day in February every four years. While the Gregorian calendar is based on the Julian calendar — the calendar was introduced around 45 BCE by Julius Caesar after consulting an astronomer — the Gregorian calendar is also based on the year of Christ’s birth.

The Gregorian calendar sought to improve on its predecessors. The purpose was to have a more regular format than the lunar calendars and Julian calendar. The Gregorian calendar took the place of the Julian calendar around the end of the 16th Century.

the Hijrah story (final): the Ummah of Islam.

Emphasis upon community (Ummah) in Islam.

Islam places as much emphasis on the establishment of a just and social community as it does on attaining personal piety. Hypocrisy is defined as public display of piety and private acts of uncharitable behavior.

“Seest thou one that denies the Faith Such is the man who repulses the orphan And discourages the feeding of the indigent So woe to those who offer the prescribed prayer But are unmindful of the purpose (underlying it) Who only make a show of devotion But refrain from even elementary acts of kindness” (Qur’an 107: 1-7)

Symbolic of the importance of society over the individual is the fact that worship in a group is deemed more desirable than in solitude. It was therefore quite natural that the Masjid became the center of all activities in Madinah .It was the focal point around which all activities of the community, religious, social, political and economic were conducted.
The Prophet didn’t have a house separate from the Masjid and small rooms were built along the perimeter of the Masjid for his wives. In one corner of the Masjid was a flat platform (as-suffah), where visitors who had no other place to stay would sleep. Prominent among the “people of as-suffah”, a few years later, was Abu Hurayrah, the famous chronicler of the Prophetic traditions. The first few days in Madinah also saw the beginning of the “Adhan” or the call for prayer.
Another notable act of building a cohesive Ummah was that the Madinans, called the “Ansars” or helpers, took on all of the responsibilities of the Migrants or “Muhajirun” (approximately forty five in number at that time), and treated them as their brothers.

“Verily, they who have believed and left their homes and staked their lives and wealth in the cause of Allah, And also they, who have given shelter and help to them, These shall be friends the one to the other…” “They who have believed and left their county and struggled in the way of Allah, And they who have given the Prophet and his followers asylum, And been helpful to them, these are verily the faithful. Mercy is their due and an honorable provision.” (Qur’an 8:72 and 74)

In a very short period after the Migration to Madinah, Muhammad (S) had proven himself capable of uniting various factions and setting exemplary standards of cooperation between them. He made a seamless switch from being a person under constant persecution to a leader with a large administrative and judicial responsibility. However this phase provided only a short respite before the next period of his mission. This phase was marked by crucial battles for survival of the Muslim community.

the hijrah story5: Islamic pluralism

Pluralism-The Islamic view

The concepts laid out in the “covenant” provide an outline for a pluralistic society. Pluralism is essential in ensuring dignity to minorities in any multi-religious society. Even in countries where, for all practical purposes, there is only one religion, there are sects and groups within the religion that demand the protection and spiritual and intellectual freedom which pluralism offers. The concept of pluralism differs substantially from tolerance alone. Pluralism presupposes equality amongst various groups, rather than one elite group merely tolerating another inferior group out of charity. It allows for coexistence of different religious communities that live by their own beliefs, judge themselves by their own laws, and help each other against any outside threat.
The Qur’an may be the only major scripture which talks explicitly about pluralism.

Verily they who believe (in the message of Qur’an) And they who are Jews, Christians, and Sabeans (a religious group whose identity is obscured by history) Whoever believes in Allah and the Last Day, and does that which is right Shall have their reward with their Lord. Fear shall not come upon them and neither shall they grieve. (Qur’an 2:62)

The Qur’an also condemns the antithesis of pluralism that is “Particularism” (a theological belief that only an elect few who follow a particular faith are eligible for redemption).

And (both) the Jews and the Christians say, “We are Allah’s children, and His beloved ones” Say! Why then does He cause you to suffer for your sins? Nay you are but human beings of His creating He forgives whom He wills” (Qur’an 5:18-